Korkoro: Come, let’s away to prison: We two alone will sing like birds i’ the cage

'Korkoro' is one of my favourite films. Directed by Tony Gatlif, a French Algerian of Roma ethnicity,  it came out in 2010 and is one of those World War Two films you may not have seen, but it is a real gem. It documents the rarely-mentioned topic of porajmos, the Romani holocaust. It is set …

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Hopkins’ poems: sprung rhythm and ‘unmanly grief’?

If I were to find myself in a position where I would write a thesis about someone who had a creative and intriguing life, a contender for my  research and attention would be the priest and  poet, Gerard Manley Hopkins, (1844-1889). He had a fascinating and tragic time on earth: his life was short and his experiences harsh, but …

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Vegans. Are they the paragon of animals or have they lost all their mirth?

I am Judy, and I am a vegan. I try to keep it quiet, except in restaurants. Over the years I have developed the skill of asking for something I can eat, latterly even expecting it. I have had well over 20 years of practice. I am not a quiet vegan in my blogging, however. I blog …

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Review: Benedict Cumberbatch as Hamlet

Although audiences looking for a more faithful adaptation, without additions or subtractions, may feel Lyndsey Turner's Hamlet isn't complete or fulfilling, there are plenty of reasons why this Cumberbatch Hamlet hits the mark. Benedict Cumberbatch himself is a likeable, accessible Hamlet, his madness arising from his grief. This is entirely clear, easily marked out from the …

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